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Far from the Madding Crowd

Far from the Madding Crowd

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Far from the Madding Crowd (1874) is Thomas Hardy's fourth novel and his first major literary success. It originally appeared anonymously as a monthly serial in Cornhill Magazine, where it gained a wide readership. The novel is the first to be set in Hardy's fictional county of Wessex in rural south west England. It deals in themes of love, honour and betrayal, against a backdrop of the seemingly idyllic, but often harsh, realities of a farming community in Victorian England. It describes the farmer Bathsheba Everdene, her life and relationships - especially with her lonely neighbour William Boldwood, the faithful shepherd Gabriel Oak, and the thriftless soldier Sergeant Troy. On publication, critical notices were plentiful and mostly positive. Hardy revised the text extensively for the 1895 edition and made further changes for the 1901 edition. The novel was listed at number 48 on the BBC's survey The Big Read in 2003. The book finished 10th on the Guardian's list of greatest love stories of all time in 2007. The novel has been dramatised several times, notably in an Oscar-nominated 1967 film directed by John Schlesinger. From Wikipedia (CC BY-SA).

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Keywords

  • Didactic fiction
  • Farm life -- Fiction
  • GITenberg
  • Love stories
  • Pastoral fiction
  • PR
  • Triangles (Interpersonal relations) -- Fiction
  • Wessex (England) -- Fiction
  • Women farmers -- Fiction

Links

web: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/107

Editions

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